$200,000 Award: Successful Unpaid Sales Commissions Arbitration

An arbitrator has awarded over $200,000 to a client represented by Natalie Koss, Esq., for unpaid sales commissions. The employer sells billions of dollars of open source software service packages annually.

The successful arbitration award is for a technology salesperson who disputed the manner his employer categorized sales. The employer improperly categorized new sales as renewals for certain deals. When he alerted his employer to the mistake, they did nothing to resolve the situation and refused to provide documentation supporting their decision.

The employee’s only option was to hire a lawyer experienced in unpaid sales commission claims. His employment contracts required him seek a resolution of commission disputes through binding arbitration. The arbitrator agreed with the case that Ms. Koss argued on behalf of her client. You can read more about the decision here.

Federal Agency Branch Chief Wins EEOC Hearing

A Federal agency branch chief represented by Natalie Koss, Esq., has succeeded in winning a contentious, five-year battle over sex discrimination. The judge delivered the decision after a seven-day EEOC hearing, which resulted in an order that would save the employee’s career.

Her experience began when the agency removed her from her position for discriminatory reasons and attempted to discipline her. The EEOC decision states that the agency was wrong and orders the agency instate her in a similar position. The decision also provides monetary and pay awards, and it directs the agency to provide specific individuals with EEO training, while penalizing those who participated in the discriminatory conduct. You can read more about the decision here.

Here’s What Happens When You Breach Your Employment or Severance Agreement

Employers are increasingly watching former employees who have signed binding agreements to protect the employer’s data, business information, reputation and customers. If you’ve signed a non-disclosure, non-compete, non-solicitation or severance agreement, then you have an obligation to follow the instructions in those agreements.

Breaches of these agreements are frequent. Employees may purposefully or accidentally breach these agreements. Unfortunately, social media, online activity and digital evidence have made it easy for employers to identify breaches. This often results in the employer sending the employee or former employee a notice of breach or demand letter.

As with any threat of legal action, an employee is in immediate need of legal counsel to understand the financial liability for the breach and the appropriate legal response. [continued]